United States

Just like for the Soviet Army, the wartime experience weighted considerably over the tank tactical doctrine of the US Army, as well as for the USMC. Considerable forces were still mobilized, mostly in Germany. These were the 6th and 12th army corps, historically those which first invaded the German territory in the spring of 1945. These units comprised the bulk of US tank forces, with a wide array of recent Sherman types, M26 Pershings and M24 Chaffee.

They were spread out over a wide territory, mostly in the southern part of Germany and Austria and with the later reorganization of the occupation zones, the US Forces stationed in West Germany came into a single command, the USAREUR, first designated The European Theater of Operations, U. S. Army (ETOUSA), then USFET and EUCOM. It was commanded by for logistics and administration was Major General John C.H. (“Court House”) Lee. After may 1945, the HQ was moved from Versailles to moved to the I.G. Farbenindustrie Building in Frankfurt, then Heidelberg and with the merger later between the British and US zones of occupation, the HQ was moved again to Stuttgart in 1949. With the following events which raised tensions with USSR (the Berlin blockade, the communist coup in Czechoslovakia, first Soviet nuclear detonation, and invasion of Korea), the Seventh U. S. Army was activated at Stuttgart in late November 1950, comprising five full armored divisions.

When the Berlin wall was erected in august 1961 by soviet troops, the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment was deployed to Europe along with additional support units to protect the flow of refugees, while the 1st Battle Group, 18th Infantry (Reinforced) was also sent to west Berlin. By 1962 when the crisis was at the highest, no less than 277 342 personnel were stationed in Germany. The former US-British zone of occupation was further extended when the French occupation zone was evacuated due to De Gaulle’s decision of a NATO withdrawal in 1967. By 1961, US Forces in Germany were the first to receive the new M60 tank, but also the M113 armored personnel carrier, M151 truck, M14 rifle and M-60 machine gun. However, due to economic problems, the command started rotating battle groups and battalions to Europe to short tours.
Sort By:  
T34 Heavy Tank

The T34 Heavy Tank was an American design for a heavy tank. It was evolved from the T29 Heavy Tank and T30 Heavy Tank in 1945, sporting a 120 mm (4.72 in) modified anti-aircraft gun. Extra armor plating was applied to the rear of the turret bustle as a counterweight for the heavier 120mm T53 main gun. The vehicle was deemed too heavy and no production orders were placed.

£16.99
M4a1e6 Sherman 'Oddball tank with speakers'
In 1949, the United States initiated the Mutual Defense Assistance Program. Allies and potential allies were provided with various kinds of monetary and materiel support in an effort to build up their defenses against the perceived threats of the Cold War. Many countries received tanks, most of which were WW II surplus. The above photo shows Half-tracks, Hi Speed Tractors, trucks & Shermans "hermetically" sealed & ready for MDAP shipment. New York Port of Embarkation, Brooklyn, March, 1951.
£9.99
M48 Patton Main Battle Tank

The M48 Patton is an American first generation main battle tank (MBT) introduced in February 1951. It was designed as a replacement for the M26 Pershing, M4 Sherman variants and M46 Pattons used in the Korean War, and as the successor to the M47 Patton.[8] Nearly 12,000 M48s were built, mainly by Chrysler and AlCo, from 1952 to 1961. The M48 underwent many design modifications and improvements during its production life. This led to a wide variety of suspension systems, cupola styles, power packs, fenders and other details among individual tanks. The early designs, up to the M48A2C, were powered by a gasoline engine. The M48A3 and A5 versions used a diesel engine, however gasoline engine versions were still in use in the US Army National Guard through 1968 and through 1975 by many West German Army units. Numerous examples of the M48 saw combat use in various Arab–Israeli conflicts and the Vietnam War. Beginning in 1959, most American M48A1s and A2s were upgraded to the M48A3 model.

The M48 Patton-series saw widespread service with the United States and NATO until it was superseded by the M60 tank as well as being widely exported. The tank's hull also developed a wide variety of prototypical, utility and support vehicles such as armored recovery vehicles and bridge layers. Some M48A5 models served into the mid-1980s with US Army National Guard units, and were used as targets for weapons and radar testing into the mid-1990s. Many M48s remain in service in other countries though most of these have been highly modified and had their firepower, mobility and protection upgraded to increase their combat effectiveness on the modern battlefield. The Turkish Army has the largest number of modernized M48 MBTs, with more than 1,400 in its inventory. Of these, around 1,000 have been phased out, placed in storage, or modified as armoured recovery vehicles.

£13.99
M48 A1/A2 Patton Main Battle Tank

The M48 Patton is an American first generation main battle tank (MBT) introduced in February 1951. It was designed as a replacement for the M26 Pershing, M4 Sherman variants and M46 Pattons used in the Korean War, and as the successor to the M47 Patton.[8] Nearly 12,000 M48s were built, mainly by Chrysler and AlCo, from 1952 to 1961. The M48 underwent many design modifications and improvements during its production life. This led to a wide variety of suspension systems, cupola styles, power packs, fenders and other details among individual tanks. The early designs, up to the M48A2C, were powered by a gasoline engine. The M48A3 and A5 versions used a diesel engine, however gasoline engine versions were still in use in the US Army National Guard through 1968 and through 1975 by many West German Army units. Numerous examples of the M48 saw combat use in various Arab–Israeli conflicts and the Vietnam War. Beginning in 1959, most American M48A1s and A2s were upgraded to the M48A3 model.

The M48 Patton-series saw widespread service with the United States and NATO until it was superseded by the M60 tank as well as being widely exported. The tank's hull also developed a wide variety of prototypical, utility and support vehicles such as armored recovery vehicles and bridge layers. Some M48A5 models served into the mid-1980s with US Army National Guard units, and were used as targets for weapons and radar testing into the mid-1990s. Many M48s remain in service in other countries though most of these have been highly modified and had their firepower, mobility and protection upgraded to increase their combat effectiveness on the modern battlefield. The Turkish Army has the largest number of modernized M48 MBTs, with more than 1,400 in its inventory. Of these, around 1,000 have been phased out, placed in storage, or modified as armoured recovery vehicles.

£13.99
M48 A3 Patton Main Battle Tank

The M48 Patton is an American first generation main battle tank (MBT) introduced in February 1951. It was designed as a replacement for the M26 Pershing, M4 Sherman variants and M46 Pattons used in the Korean War, and as the successor to the M47 Patton.[8] Nearly 12,000 M48s were built, mainly by Chrysler and AlCo, from 1952 to 1961. The M48 underwent many design modifications and improvements during its production life. This led to a wide variety of suspension systems, cupola styles, power packs, fenders and other details among individual tanks. The early designs, up to the M48A2C, were powered by a gasoline engine. The M48A3 and A5 versions used a diesel engine, however gasoline engine versions were still in use in the US Army National Guard through 1968 and through 1975 by many West German Army units. Numerous examples of the M48 saw combat use in various Arab–Israeli conflicts and the Vietnam War. Beginning in 1959, most American M48A1s and A2s were upgraded to the M48A3 model.

The M48 Patton-series saw widespread service with the United States and NATO until it was superseded by the M60 tank as well as being widely exported. The tank's hull also developed a wide variety of prototypical, utility and support vehicles such as armored recovery vehicles and bridge layers. Some M48A5 models served into the mid-1980s with US Army National Guard units, and were used as targets for weapons and radar testing into the mid-1990s. Many M48s remain in service in other countries though most of these have been highly modified and had their firepower, mobility and protection upgraded to increase their combat effectiveness on the modern battlefield. The Turkish Army has the largest number of modernized M48 MBTs, with more than 1,400 in its inventory. Of these, around 1,000 have been phased out, placed in storage, or modified as armoured recovery vehicles.

£13.99
Per Page      1 - 5 of 5
  • 1